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Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, Bottled in Bond

This is simply a blog post for myself, so I can remember what the terms mean. I do get asked occasionally...prosit!

Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, Bottled in Bond

Whiskey - "An alcoholic distillate from a fermented mash of grain produced at less than 190 proof in such a manner that the distillate produces the taste, aroma, and characteristics generally attributed to whikey, stored in oak containers and bottled at not less than 80 proof, and also includes mixtures of such distillates for which no specific standards of identify are prescribed."

Bourbon - "Whisky produced at not exceeding 160 proof from a fermented mash of not less than 51 percent corn and stored at not more than 125 proof in charred new oak containers, and also includes mixtures of such whiskies of the same type."

Therefore, Bourbon is a specific type of whiskey.

Straight - "Whiskies conforming to the standard prescribed in the definitions of Bourbon whiskey which have been stored in some type of oak containers prescribed for a period of two years or more. All grains were distilled at lower proofs and contain no neutral grain spirits. Only water has been added."

Kentucky - "The State of distillation of domestic types of whiskey and straight whiskey, except for light whiskey and blends."

Bottled in Bond - The whiskey must be a product of one distillery, distilled during a single season, bottled at exactly 100 proof, aged and for a minimum of four years in a federally-bonded and -supervised facility.


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